SEARCH RESAULTS FOR Tel Aviv (7)

''Kaleidoscope''
1996, 9'9"
comissioned by the Musica Nova Consort.
I have chosen this combination of instruments which produces a very specific sound in which the flute is quite conspicuous. My compositional point of departure was the sonority of the ensemble and therefore I have tried to use instruments of different families which permit a variety of sound production; wind, string,  plucked instrument and tuned percussion instruments of wood and metal.
There is only one movement and the work is interally divided into two sections which differ from one another but are connected through common thematic material. The material was drawn from the name Rami which by association reminds one of the notes RE and MI (D and E). Both notes run throughout the composition in various ways. The other materials are taken from the scales typical of my chosen instruments, in particular from the pentatonic scale of the marimba and the natural diatonic scale of the harp.
The character is strongly influenced by the impression of a colourful kleidoscope, whose images change fast. It finds expression in the first section in fast changing materials which are almost never repeated, but are placed side by side. Fast motoric parts alternate in the piece with lyrical expressive passages. In the second section the colouring and kleidoscopic character stem from a different treatment – from the harmonic, rhythmic and orchestral aspect – of a melodic idea which repeats itself time and again as if in a persistent ritual.
Duration:
9'9""
Composing Year:
1996
Preformance Year:
1996
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''Between the Sacred and the Profane'' for string quartet
1998, 9'39"
Between the Sacred and the Profane for String Quartet has two movements based on rhythmic and melodic materials which draw upon sources of Jewish liturgical music and songs of the various communities of the people of Israel.  The first movement is based on a limited number of biblical cantillations combining two versions: the Moroccan-Casablanca version and the Spanish-Jerusalem one. It is a recitative, prayer-like in character and embodies both the prayers of the individual and of the congregation. It is freely constructed and its language is chromatic and expressive. The second movement is based, in the main, on three wedding songs of the Jewish community of Tetuan in Spanish Morocco which is renowed for the beauty and wealth of its songs. The songs were picked out from the anthology "the Cycle of Life", edited by Dr. Shoshana Weich-Shahak. These are Ladino songs influenced by Spanish melos and rhythm yet they retain the taste of biblical cantillations. The work was commissioned by the Israeli Music Heritage Project.
Duration:
9'39""
Composing Year:
1991
Preformance Year:
1998
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Suita Concertante (Encounters IV) for Classical Violin, Klezmer Violin and Chamber Orchestra
Doron Solomon 2007, 22'20"
This is another one in a chain of pieces I've already written in the past which tries to bridge between different musical cultures. In this case it's the ethnic. folk-like klezmer tradition alongside that of the concert hall with the virtuoso classical violin.
 
The piece is written in one long movement, which flows from one emotional mood to another trying to reflect different phases of our inner self.
I've used quite a few magnificent klezmer tunes and dances  and added  some original ones which I've invented.
 
 Each soloist is representing in a way his/her tradition of playing the violin, but as this is a real encounter and not a confrontation, they also influence each other respectively. I've let both my soloists emphasize their expressive and technical abilities in different phases of the piece.
 
Writing such a piece for me was a way to connect to the deepest and even primordial layers of my memories as an infant and a child. It deeply reflects my innermost beliefs as a Jew and as a human being.
 
The composition was commissioned by the J.M.I. in London and supported by the Arts Council of England
Duration:
22'20""
Composing Year:
2006
Preformance Year:
2007
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Concerto for Cello and Orchestra - ''Behold, as the Clay in the Potter's Hand'' I. Adagio molto espressivo - Andante espressivo
Noam Sheriff 1992, 10'29"
The Cello Concerto was inspired by the prayers of the Day of Atonement: "Behold as the Clay in the Potter's Hand". 
The relationship that develops between the potter and the clay is "a frame of reference" for the musical form chosen by the composer, whereby the potter is represented by the soloist and the clay by the orchestra. The musical substance of the concerto is derived, on one hand, from a restricred number of "Te'amin" (the traditional biblical cantilations) and on the other hand from an aggregation of sounds built on an adcending row of intervals from the "minor second" to the "major sixth".
There is a long prologue that merges organically with the first movement which has a serene and passionate nature. The second movement starting with a sarabande-like lyrical theme soon gets very dramatic. The end of the movement brings again the memory of the first theme and flows almost unimterruptedly into the last movement. This is a very fast, polyrythmical movement of a somewhat eastern character. The rhythmical cells and motives soon "evaporate" into a very tranquil postlude fading out delicately.
 
The work was commissioned by the Israel Symhpony Orchestra Rishon-Lezion, which gave it its world premiere in 1992 under the baton of Noam Sheriff. it is dedicated to the orchestra's solo cellist Doron Toister and was awarded a grant by Tel-Aviv Foundation for Literature and Art.
Duration:
10'29""
Composing Year:
1992
Preformance Year:
1992
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Concerto for Cello and Orchestra - ''Behold, as the Clay in the Potter's Hand'' II.Adagio cantabile
Noam Sheriff 1992, 6'14"
The Cello Concerto was inspired by the prayers of the Day of Atonement: "Behold as the Clay in the Potter's Hand". 
The relationship that develops between the potter and the clay is "a frame of reference" for the musical form chosen by the composer, whereby the potter is represented by the soloist and the clay by the orchestra. The musical substance of the concerto is derived, on one hand, from a restricred number of "Te'amin" (the traditional biblical cantilations) and on the other hand from an aggregation of sounds built on an adcending row of intervals from the "minor second" to the "major sixth".
There is a long prologue that merges organically with the first movement which has a serene and passionate nature. The second movement starting with a sarabande-like lyrical theme soon gets very dramatic. The end of the movement brings again the memory of the first theme and flows almost unimterruptedly into the last movement. This is a very fast, polyrythmical movement of a somewhat eastern character. The rhythmical cells and motives soon "evaporate" into a very tranquil postlude fading out delicately.
 
The work was commissioned by the Israel Symhpony Orchestra Rishon-Lezion, which gave it its world premiere in 1992 under the baton of Noam Sheriff. it is dedicated to the orchestra's solo cellist Doron Toister and was awarded a grant by Tel-Aviv Foundation for Literature and Art.
Duration:
6'14""
Composing Year:
1992
Preformance Year:
1992
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